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INDEX:
Gift Registry
Store Fixtures

Gift Registry Store Fixtures

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This Gift Registry Store Fixtures index page aggregates links
to all post and photos of retail merchandising, display, and outfitting
as well as deep Background courtesy of Wikipedia.

BACKSTORY: In retail, a product return is the process of a customer taking previously purchased merchandise back to the retailer, and in turn receiving a refund in the original form of payment, exchange for another item (identical or different), or a store credit.

Many retailers will accept returns provided that the customer has a receipt as a proof of purchase, and that certain other conditions, which depend on the retailer’s policies, are met. These may include the merchandise being in a certain condition (usually resellable if not defective), no more than a certain amount of time having passed since the purchase, and sometimes that identification be provided (though usually only if a receipt is not provided). In some cases, only exchanges or store credit are offered, again usually only without a receipt, or after an initial refund period has passed.[1] Some retailers charge a restocking fee for non-defective returned merchandise, but typically only if the packaging has been opened.[1]

While retailers are not usually required to accept returns, laws in many places require retailers to post their return policy in a place where it would be visible to the customer prior to purchase.[2]

In certain countries, such as Australia, consumer rights dictate that under certain situations consumers have a right to demand a refund.[3] These situations include sales that relied on false or misleading claims, defective goods, and undisclosed conditions of sale.

There are various reasons why customers may wish to return merchandise. These include a change of one’s mind (buyer’s remorse), quality of the merchandise, personal dissatisfaction, or a mistaken purchase of the wrong product. For clothing or other sized items, it may be a lack of a correct fit. Sometimes, there may be a product recall in which the manufacturer has requested (or been ordered) that the merchandise be brought back to the store. Also, gift receipts are offered sometimes when an item is purchased for another person, and the recipient can exchange this item for another item of comparable value, or for store credit, often on a gift card.[4]

In the US, an estimated 8-10% of in-store sales is returned whereas online sales may result in 25-40% returns. In Asia and Europe, less than 5 percent of purchases are returned.[5]

In the United States, various abuses using the return process allegedly cost retailers more than $9 billion annually.[6]

One common practice is the use of the system in order to “borrow” the merchandise at no charge. The customer who engages in this practice purchases the item for temporary use, then returns it when finished. Examples include an article of clothing worn for a single occasion, or a book that is returned after it has been read. Stores such as Macy’s and Ross put large “do not remove” tags on women’s dresses to try to defeat this, not accepting returns or exchanges for any items that do not have the tag. Many stores also refuse to refund certain items like reading materials, inflatable airbeds (Target and Walmart), and even portable heaters (Dollar General).

Another problem is when customers legitimately purchase an item, then re-enter the store with the receipt, take an identical item off the shelf, and approach the customer servicedesk requesting a refund. In the process, they essentially receive the item for free, and may be charged with shoplifting or another similar crime if caught.

Others have been reported to print fake receipts which they use to return stolen merchandise for a cash refund. However, this is nearly impossible now that most stores use individually numbered receipts. Scanning the receipt’s barcode at the cash register links legitimate returns to a database that validates the original purchase. (Despite this, some stores that have had such systems for years still refuse to accept a photocopy of a legitimate receipt where the original may have been misplaced, or obscured due to the store’s use of cheap thermal paper or very light ink.)

(SOURCE: Wikipedia)

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Follow Gift Registry Store Fixtures at…

Paired Gift Registry Work Stations
” Dual Console Gift Registry Station
” Dual Console Gift Registry Qualifiers
” Freestanding Baby Registry Kiosk Display
Brand Name Dropping At Gift Registry
Baby and Gift Registry Ballot Box
Linea Donatella Wedding Gift Registry I Do
Top Reasons For Your Bridal Registry At Macys
Bridal Confections Courtesy of the NutHouse

Follow Macy’s Gift Registry at…

Macy’s Gift Registry Video Console
Top Reasons For Your Bridal Registry At Macys
How To Create A Gift Registry Table-Top Guide
Create A Gift Registry Freestanding Kiosk
” Freestanding Gift Registry Pedestal And More

Follow Boscov’s Gift Registry Merchandising at…

Gift Registry Countdown of Services Cuts Across Store Sightlines
Half-Size Gift Registry Kiosk Stands Ready For Customers
Gift Registry Military Discount Program Cross-Sell
Boscov’s Pricing Policy Statement Spells It All Out

For all Gift Registry Store Fixtures Resources see…

“ Gift Registry Store Fixtures Pinterest Board “
“ Gift Registry Store Fixtures Index Page ”

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